• Socioscapes. International Journal of Societies, Politics and Cultures Fourth issue (Winter 2021) Call N. 3 «Digital work: more autonomy or a new subjugation of work?»

    2020-06-04

     

    Socioscapes. International Journal of Societies, Politics and Cultures

    Fourth issue (Winter 2021)

    Call N.3

    «Digital work: more autonomy or a new subjugation of work?»

    Guest Editors:Antunes Ricardo – University of Campinas (rantunes@unicamp.br), Basso Pietro – University of Venice (pbasso@unive.it), and Perocco Fabio – University of Venice (fabio.perocco@unive.it).

    The last two decades have seen profound transformations of work, both in the process of work organisation and in the functioning of the labour market. Among these, the most recent and fastest is the computerisation of work, in particular the digitisation of work. A new frontier has thus opened up in the field of work and, at the same time, in the exploitation and precarisation of work, which the current health and social-economic crisis is widening out of all proportion. The practice and the myth of “smart working” are the visible signs of a planetary dynamic of capitalist matrix which, once again, presents the possible liberation and humanization of labour within the framework of a new, and perhaps more radical, alienation, atomization and subordination of labour to the imperatives of the market and profit.

    The aim of this issue of the Journal is to critically analyse this dynamic, paying particular attention to the relationship between the so-called “digital platforms” and their “applications”: alongside the intense development of informal and digital technology, we are witnessing the expansion of different modes of intense exploitation of the workforce, which is expressed in highly precarious working conditions, long working days, low wages, high levels of illness. Usually these new forms of work are presented as free and autonomous “services”, the workers involved become “self-entrepreneurs”, “masters” of their working time. And this allows the platforms, i.e. the companies that own and control them, to circumvent and cheat on the labour laws of the countries in which they operate.

    From this set of labour transformation processes, in which the technological element appears on the surface as prevalent on the structure of social relations that actually subsume it, important issues emerge that are of great interest for this call for papers dedicated to digital work:

    - What, in fact, characterizes this new mode of work? First of all: Is it something completely new, for the use it makes of ITC resources, or is it a combination of old and new forms of work organization? Based on what criteria, and for what purposes, were the algorithms built? How do they control the time and intensity of work? Who controls the algorithms? What is the role of artificial intelligence in these new forms of work delivery? What are, in them, the connections between materiality, immateriality, digital work and the creation of value and wealth? What about the exploitation of labour and overwork (surplus value)? How does the creation of surplus value take place when work is unpaid? What are the new ways taken up by the conflict between capital and labour? Is it possible to regulate these jobs that do not stop expanding?

    - There are also important questions relating to the social consequences of the computerization and digitization of work, which are also of great importance for this issue of the Journal: the impact of computerization on work intensification and working time; the effects of digitization on the qualification/dequalification processes of work and workers; the relationship between digitization and precarization; the impact of digitization on wages, and on de-salarization phenomena; digitization as an element of (material, social, psychological) impoverishment and a factor of new social inequalities.

    And last but not least: with the expansion of the so-called Industry 4.0 - which will further intensify the robotization and digital automation in all possible activities, through the "internet of things", the expansion of artificial intelligence, with profound consequences on employment - what are the main consequences for the working class? What is the new configuration of the working class? What are the possible forms of resistance, organisation and representation of this growing part of the working class?

    We invite article proposal submissions that respond to the above issues and questions. Proposal submissions should include information about the author(s), their institutional affiliations, their contact details, a 500 words (maximum) abstract, some keywords (from a minimum of 3 to a maximum of 5). Once selected, papers should be between 5000 and 8000 words (excluding bibliography).

    Languages: English, French, Italian, Spanish. Please follow the instructions gathered in the Author’s guidelines. All texts must be transmitted in a format compatible with Windows (.doc or .rtf), following the instructions provided by the Peer Review Process. Please see the Journal’s Author’s guidelines.

    Abstracts must be submitted by email to: Antunes Ricardo – University of Campinas (rantunes@unicamp.br), Basso Pietro – University of Venice (pbasso@unive.it) and Perocco Fabio – University of Venice (fabio.perocco@unive.it).

    Timetable for the publishing process:

    1. May 15th, 2020 – proposals’ abstract submission

    2. May 30th, 2020 – selection

    3. November 1st, 2020 – articles proposal

    4. November 30th, 2020 – double blind peer review

    5. December 30th, 2020 revising of the articles according to the reviewers’ comments

    6. February 2021 – publishing

    Read more about Socioscapes. International Journal of Societies, Politics and Cultures Fourth issue (Winter 2021) Call N. 3 «Digital work: more autonomy or a new subjugation of work?»
  • NEW DEADLINE CALL 2 - Socioscapes. International Journal of Societies, Politics and Cultures Second issue (Summer 2020) “Gender and Sexualities Studies in Difficult Times: Uncertain Presents, Coalitional Futures”

    2020-06-04

    Socioscapes. International Journal of Societies, Politics and Cultures

    Second issue (Summer 2020)

    “Gender and Sexualities Studies in Difficult Times: Uncertain Presents, Coalitional Futures”

    Guest Editors: Dr Samuele Grassi (University of Florence-Monash University), Dr Churnjeet Mahn (University of Strathclyde), Dr Cirus Rinaldi (University of Palermo), and Prof Yvette Taylor (University of Strathclyde)

    Abstracts are sought for the Special Issue of Socioscapes. International Journal of Societies, Politics and Cultures, titled “Gender and Sexualities Studies in Difficult Times: Uncertain Presents, Coalitional Futures”.

    Media and press coverage of the coronavirus pandemic is building ostentatious narratives such as ‘the world being different after this’ and this being a ‘life-changing moment’. These discourses rest on the assumption that the not-too-distant future is going to open new possibilities for everyone. Not only do they extend the paradigmatic caveat of the pull of the present vs. the future, but also, they foreclose recognition of and engagement with the effects of this crisis that are already visible in the lives of vulnerable and precarious groups.

    Feminist and queer interventions in the social sciences and humanities have explored personal and public narratives of pandemics and illness, with notable examples ranging from Audre Lorde’s diaries (1980) to Susan Sontag’s use of illness-as-metaphor (1978; 1988), Eve K. Sedgwick’s narratives on AIDS and cancer (1993; 2000) and Ann Cvetkovich’s delving into trauma archives (2000). Times of crisis outbreak worsen the conditions of vulnerability shared by marginalised, oppressed, and under-represented groups (Heckert 2004) – casual and sessional workers, sex workers, care workers, the homeless, migrants, asylum seekers and refugees, and people living in contexts of conflict. How can we address the rhetorical use of the mask of ‘a different world waiting for us’ to justify and to cover over acts of institutional violence, often legitimised through discourse about citizenship (including sexual citizenship)? What can be learned from past ‘crises’ and ‘pandemics’?

    The second issue of Socioscapes seeks contributions combining disciplines, approaches and methods to expose the economic, social, pedagogic, emotional, and political strains of ‘crises’ and to offer new directions for the socially engaged humanities and social sciences. It aims to provide a platform for networking, coalition-building, and alliances in these difficult times. Proposals are welcome in one or more of the following themes and their interrelations:

    • Crises and/or pandemic(s) seen from ‘the margins’;
    • The effects of the coronavirus pandemic on increasing future labour insecurity;
    • Gender, queer and intersectional approaches to ‘living in difficult times’;
    • Gender, queer and intersectional approaches to histories of illnesses and pandemics;
    • Representations of pandemic(s) in literature, theatre, and film;
    • The current pandemic and the resurgence of nationalistic rhetoric: the ‘enemies’ of the State

    We invite proposals from academics and non-academics that respond to the above issues and questions in any of the journal sections and subsections (‘Topics’; ‘Research, interventions, and ‘Works in progress’; ‘Conflicts, resistances, and voices’; ‘Reprints and represented: old and new classics’; ‘Keywords’; ‘Reviews and portraits’). Information on the journal is available on the website: http://www.socioscapes.org/index.php/sc/about. Proposals should include information about the author(s), institutional affiliations, contact details, a 250-300 words (maximum) abstract, keywords (3 to 5). Once selected, papers should be between 5000-6000 words (including Bibliography). Languages: English, French, Italian, Spanish. Please follow the instructions gathered in the Author’s guidelines. All texts must be transmitted in a format compatible with Windows (.doc or .rtf), following the instructions provided by the Peer Review Process. Please see the Journal’s Author’s guidelines.

    Abstracts must be submitted in English, French, Italian, and Spanish by email to: samuele.grassi@unifi.it, churnjeet.mahn@strath.ac.uk, cirus.rinaldi@unipa.it, yvette.taylor@strath.ac.uk.

    In thanking you again for submitting your abstract proposals for the Second issue of Socioscapes: International Journal or Societies, Politics and Cultures, we are sending the extended deadlines for your information, as follows:

    • July 15th, 2020 – abstract submission;
    • July 31th, 2020 – selection;
    • September 15th, 2020 – submissions due;
    • October 2020 – submissions published.

     

    Read more about NEW DEADLINE CALL 2 - Socioscapes. International Journal of Societies, Politics and Cultures Second issue (Summer 2020) “Gender and Sexualities Studies in Difficult Times: Uncertain Presents, Coalitional Futures”